GameOrigo logo

Carmonette IV – Mainframe – 1970

The last entry in the Carmonette military training simulation series expands on its predecessors by adding modeling of night vision and communications to the existing model of tank/anti-tank, infantry and armed helicopter support. It models combat scenarios for battalions and companies. Units can be ordered to move, stay still, prepare fire and fire. CARMONETTE stands for “Combined ARms Computer MOdel”

GameOrigo logo

Bridge – Mainframe – 1970

Bridge is a bridge card game written in BASIC language.
The game offers a practice session for the player. The game allows the player to bid on a given situation and will ask the player questions about the situation. When incorrect the player is told the correct answer or hints on what to do.

GameOrigo logo

Batnum – Mainframe – 1970

Batnum is a “battle of numbers” against the computer. There is a distinct number of items on a pile and the player and computer take turns removing items. Depending on the choices made at the start of the game whoever picks the first or last item wins the game. The player can also determine the maximum number of items that can be taken in a turn.

GameOrigo logo

Bandit – Mainframe – 1970

Bandit is a text-based slot machine simulation game written in BASIC for the PDP-10. The player starts with an initial balance and can try to make a winning by playing the slot machine. The bandit’s arm is pulled by pressing the return key. The game is over when the player runs out of money. The player is free to determine the amount of money to spend on each spin.

GameOrigo logo

Apawam – Mainframe – 1970

Apawam is a golf game which allows the player to play on the Apawamis Country Club. The player can use a wood, iron, putter and wedge club. With values the player determines the strength of the swing. From the tee the player is told the distance to the hole and after each swing the new distance is made known.

GameOrigo logo

1Queen – Mainframe – 1970

1Queen is an early BASIC puzzle game based on chess rules. The player can move a queen on a chess board, but the queen can only move left, down and left and down diagonally. The player alternates turns with the computer alternate turns for moving the queen. The player to put it in the bottom left corner of board wins the game.